Guide to Eating Healthy During Menopause

March 15

Your body goes through a lot during menopause. To make your body's transition simpler, fill up on this nutrient-rich menopause food!

Hot flashes, weight gain, and mood swings— these put together make menopause a horrible phase of a woman’s life and you've probably heard a lot of complaints about "the transition." However, you can counter this problem with this primer on what you can do to make the transition easier, including following a menopausal diet and making simple yet important lifestyle adjustments.

A good menopause diet can help alleviate menopausal symptoms and the effects of hormonal variations on daily living. Following a menopause diet plan can also assist you in avoiding foods and beverages that may exacerbate symptoms and have a negative impact on hormones. Furthermore, a well-planned menopause diet can help you lose weight while also making you feel healthier and more active.

So, whether you're going through early menopause or one of the three stages of menopause, you can use all the help you can get when it comes to navigating the sometimes difficult path of menopause. The effects of hot flashes, mood swings, can be severe. However, by adding these ten types of foods to your everyday meals you can try to alleviate some of these menopause symptoms.

 Whole Grains (Barley, Brown Rice, Millet, etc.)

Whole Grains (Barley, Brown Rice, Millet, etc.)

Source: Unsplash

Yes, whole grains are considered "healthy carbs'' for a variety of reasons. Whole grains are high in heart-healthy soluble fiber, plant protein, and a few B vitamins that help regulate energy and metabolism. Consumption of whole grains has been linked to a lower risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and death. Whole grains while being healthy are also light for the body and considered perfect for women around their menopause. 

Berries 

Berries

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Berries are not only naturally sweet, but they also assist to battle obesity, reducing inflammation, and lowering the risk of heart disease. To keep skin healthy and glowing during this transition, add them to your daily porridge or throw a couple with almonds for a heart-rich snack.

Eggs

Eggs

Source: The Modern Proper

Eggs are high in vitamin D and iron, two minerals that many women need. Eggs are also a good source of protein for postmenopausal women, as they have been demonstrated to lower cholesterol, reduce the risk of heart disease, and reduce obesity.

Broccoli

Broccoli

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Adding cruciferous vegetables to a menopausal woman's diet could be quite beneficial. According to one study, broccoli has a favorable effect on estrogen levels, raising the estrogen that reduces breast cancer risk while decreasing the estrogen that increases risk. Broccoli is also high in calcium, which helps to build strong bones, as well as fiber, which helps to avoid bloating and unwanted weight gain.

Salmon

Salmon

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Salmon is high in vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, which are especially important during menopause. While further research is needed, omega 3 fatty acids have been associated with a reduction in night sweats and the risk of breast cancer. Omega 3s are also advantageous to women as they transition out of menopause, according to one study.

Vitamin D is necessary for strong bones, cancer prevention, and the prevention of a number of other serious chronic diseases, all of which are influenced by menopause. Vitamin D is also linked to a lower risk of premature menopause.

Yogurt

Yogurt

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Women lose bone mass significantly during menopause as a result of hormonal changes, which in turn can contribute to postmenopausal osteoporosis. Hence, dairy products are a wonderful menopause diet food since they are high in calcium, vitamin D, and protein, and they can also assist with sleep. One research of pre-and postmenopausal women found that calcium and vitamin D-rich foods, such as yogurt, lowered the incidence of early menopause by 17% and helped to alleviate some menopause symptoms. Yogurt also contains probiotics, which are beneficial to gut health, digestion, immunity, and skin.

Leafy Greens

Leafy Greens

Source: The Spruce Eats

Do we need to give you a reason to consume greens? Because we all know there are a plethora of benefits to consuming leafy greens, especially if you're going through menopause. Consumption of cruciferous vegetables has been related to increased longevity and is a fantastic method to get a variety of hard-to-come-by minerals like calcium, magnesium, potassium, B vitamins, and fiber. Calcium and potassium keep bones and muscles healthy, B vitamins and fiber help prevent weight gain, and magnesium and B vitamins regulate our energy levels and moods, thus all of these nutrients are important for menopause health.

Soy 

Soy

Source: Unsplash

Soy has shown to be a great asset for menopausal women, soy is a phytoestrogen, which is a plant-based substance that acts as weak estrogens in the body and has been associated with fewer symptoms of menopause and stronger bones. Soy is recommended by Breast Cancer Prevention Partners for lowering breast cancer risk, recurrence, and tumor cell proliferation. But instead of highly processed soy, you can opt for edamame, tofu, tempeh, and soy-based dairy replacements.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal recipe

Source: Best Wallpaper

There's a reason oatmeal is considered a champion breakfast by so many people. Oats are low-cost health food that can help avoid diabetes, high cholesterol, weight gain, inflammation, and constipation, among other things. It is another nutritious food that can help maintain energy levels after menopause. Oatmeal is also an excellent vehicle for introducing a variety of other menopause-friendly foods such as berries, flaxseed, and yogurt.

Chicken

Roasted grill chicken recipe

Source: Clean Food Crush

Protein is necessary for maintaining body strength, and the loss of estrogen after menopause can result in a loss of muscle mass and bone strength. Defending yourself with a lean protein like chicken is a smart approach to improve your protein consumption without ingesting too much-saturated fat, which has been associated with an elevated risk of heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity when taken in excess.

While eating the right kind of food is important, what’s more, crucial is getting adequate water. Water can assist with a range of symptoms, including vaginal dryness, skin appearance, and reduction in bloating by moving fiber along. While thirst, muscle cramps, dry skin, weariness, and confusion are all symptoms of dehydration. Although there is no daily allowance suggestion, checking your urine is the best way to find out. It will be pale yellow if you are sufficiently hydrated and bright yellow if you are not, and you should start drinking more. 

What are your tips for navigating menopause? Let us know in the comments below.